Principal
Investigator
   Michel H. Devoret
 
Permanent
Staff
    Luigi Frunzio, senior research scientist
    Shyam Shankar, senior research scientist
    Giselle M. DeVito, administrative associate
    Theresa Evangeliste, administrative assistant
    Nuch Graves, program coordinator
    Maria Rao, administrative assistant
    
Visiting Scientists     Mazyar Mirrahimi
    Katrina Sliwa
 
Postdocs     Gijs de Lange
    Alexander Grimm
    Angela Kou
    
Graduate
Students
    Nick Frattini
    Max Hays
    Zlatko Minev
    Shantanu Mundhada
    Anirudh Narla
    Kyle Serniak
    Clarke Smith
    Steven Touzard
    Uri Vool
    Zhixin Wang
    Evan Zalys-Geller
 
Alumni     Baleegh Abdo (postdoc)
    Nicolas Bergeal(postdoc)
    Etienne Boaknin (postdoc)
    Markus Brink (postdoc)
    Simon Fissette (undergrad)
    Alvin Gao (undergrad)
    Kurtis Geerlings (student)
    Michael Hatridge (postdoc)
    Benjamin Huard (visiting scientist)
    Philippe Hyafil (postdoc)
    Archana Kamal (student)
    Zaki Leghtas (postdoc)
    Yehan Liu (student)
    Vladimir Manucharyan (student)
    Adam Marblestone (undergrad)
    Nick Masluk (student)
    Chris Pang (undergrad)
    Frederic Pierre (postdoc)
    Ioan Pop (postdoc)
    Chad Rigetti (postdoc)
    Flavius Schackert (student)
    Irfan Siddiqi (postdoc)
    Rajamani Vijayaraghavan (student)
    Chris Wilson (postdoc)
    William Zeng (undergrad)
Michel H. Devoret

phone : 203-432-4273

Michel graduated from Ecole Nationale Superieure des Telecommunications in Paris in 1975 and started graduate work in molecular quantum physics at the University of Orsay. He then joined Professor Anatole Abragam's laboratory in CEA-Saclay to work on NMR in solid hydrogen, and received his PhD from Paris University in 1982. He spent two post-doctoral years working on macroscopic quantum tunneling with John Clarke's laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. He pursued this research on quantum mechanical electronics upon his return to Saclay, starting his own research group with Daniel Esteve and Cristian Urbina. The main achievements of the "quantronics group" were in this period the measurement of the traversal time of tunneling, the invention of the single electron pump (now the basis of a new standard of capacitance), the first measurement of the effect of atomic valence on the conductance of a single atom, and the first observation of the Ramsey fringes of a superconducting artificial atom (quantronium). He became director of research at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) at Saclay. In 2007, Michel has been appointed to the College de France, where he taught until 2012. Michel is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2003) and a member of  the French Academy of Sciences (2008). Michel has received the Ampere Prize of the French Academy of Science (together with Daniel Esteve, 1991), the Descartes-Huygens Prize of the Royal Academy of Science of the Netherlands (1996) and the Europhysics-Agilent Prize of the European Physical Society (together with Daniel Esteve, Hans Mooij and Yasunobu Nakamura, 2004). He is also a recipient of the John Stewart Bell Prize, which he received jointly with Rob Schoelkopf in 2013. In 2014, he has been awarded, together with John Martinis and Rob Schoelkopf, the Fritz London Memorial Prize.


Currently the F. W. Beinecke Professor of Applied Physics at Yale University (which he joined in 2002), he focuses his research on experimental solid state physics with emphasis on quantum mechanical electronics or "quantronics". In this new type of electronics, electrical collective degrees of freedom like currents and voltages behave quantum mechanically. Such mesoscopic phenomena are particularly important in the realization of quantum information processing superconducting devices based on Josephson junctions, which is his main research goal. He currently focuses on the new phenomena of fault-tolerant quantum memory and remote entanglement.

Luigi Frunzio

phone : 203-432-4268

Luigi received his Masters in Physics at Federico II University in Naples, Italy, earning 110/110 Cum Laude. His thesis studied the effects of the intrinsic fluctuations in current biased Josephson tunnel junctions, and his preliminary work took place at the Superconductivity Department of the Instituto di Cibernetica of the CNR under the supervision of Professors Arturo Tagliacozzo and Roberto Cristiano. He also has a PhD from Orsay University. Luigi is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the Department of Applied Physics at Yale University. He works jointly with Prof. Devoret and Prof. Schoelkopf on experiments involving superconducting qubits. His curriculum vitae is available here

Giselle M. DeVito
Administrative Associate

Yale University, Applied Physics
15 Prospect Street / PO Box 208284
Becton Center 401
New Haven, CT 06520-8284
phone : 203-432-9654

Theresa Evangeliste
Administrative Assistant

Yale University, Applied Physics
15 Prospect Street / PO Box 208284
Becton Center 401
New Haven, CT 06520-8284
phone : 203-432-2210

Nuch Graves
Program Coordinator/Financial Analyst

Yale University, Applied Physics
15 Prospect Street / PO Box 208284
Becton Center 401
New Haven, CT 06520-8284
phone : 203-432-9610

Maria Rao
Administrative Assistant

Yale University, Applied Physics
15 Prospect Street / PO Box 208284
Becton Center 401
New Haven, CT 06520-8284
phone : 203-432-4273

Maria lives in Branford, CT and has worked at Yale since 2004. She comes from Bayer Pharmaceutical Corp. with solid corporate experience. She has a teaching degree in foreign languages (Italian, French, and Spanish) from Southern Connecticut State University. She is our awesome administrative assistant. Young, energetic, and dynamic, she gets us all the tools and research equipment we want and takes care of all the paperwork involved - with a smile that's always appreciated.

Katrina Sliwa

Katrina was born in Dedham Massachusetts and then went on to the wonderfully snowy University of Rochester where she received a Bachelor of Science in both physics and mathematics. She joined the Yale physics department in 2009 and is currently working in Qulab on fabricating circuits based around Josephson junctions.

Gijs de Lange

Gijs was born in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. He received his B.Eng. in applied physics from TH Rijswijk in 2006. He then went to TU Delft where he worked on his Master's thesis on superconducting circuits in the group of Hans Mooij and subsequently joined the group of Ronald Hanson for his PhD, studying coherence and quantum control of paramagnetic defects in diamond. After receiving his PhD in 2010 he stayed in Delft for two more years to work again on superconducting circuits, but now in the group of Leo Dicarlo. He joined Qulab in April 2015 to work on the fluxonium project and to start experiments on superconducting-semiconducting microwave circuits.

Alexander Grimm

Alexander was born in Graz, Austria. After studying at the universities of Graz and Vienna he moved to Grenoble, France, where he completed his Master’s degree in condensed matter physics at Joseph Fourier university. During his PhD, which was carried out under the supervision of Max Hofheinz at CEA Grenoble, he investigated the statistics of microwave photons emitted by inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. He joined Qulab in 2016 to work on autonomous quantum error correction.

Angela Kou

Angela was born in New York City. She graduated from Columbia University with a B.A. in Physics in 2008 and from Harvard University with a PhD in physics in 2013. While at Harvard, she studied the microscopic properties of the fractional quantum Hall effect using different types of nanostructures. She joined QuLab in the summer of 2013 and currently works on the fluxonium project.

Shyam Shankar

Shyam was born in Chennai, India. He received his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in 2004 and his graduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2010. While at Princeton, he worked with Steve Lyon, measuring electron spin coherence in silicon structures. He joined Qulab inthe summer of 2010, to work on quantum error correction and feedback in superconducting quantum circuits.

Nick Frattini

Nick grew up in Los Altos, California. He graduated in 2015 from UC Berkeley with a BS in Engineering Physics and in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. While there, he worked in Irfan Siddiqi's Quantum Nanonelectronics Laboratory on microwave superconducting circuits. Since joining Qulab in the summer of 2015, he has been investigating novel quantum-limited parametric amplifiers.

Max Hays

Max was born in Asheville, North Carolina. In 2014, he received his BS in Physics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While at Chapel Hill, Max worked with the Experimental Nuclear and Astroparticle Physics group on the Majorana experiment. He joined QuLab in the fall of 2014.

Zlatko Minev

Zlatko joins us from sunny San Francisco. He received his undergraduate degree at UC Berkeley (magna cum laude), where he pursued research at the UCB Quantum Nanoelectronics Lab. In his honors thesis, he worked on analyzing the general design principles of a novel quantum-noise limited Josephson Parametric Amplifier (JPA). He developed and implemented a versatile network distributed numerical simulator now being used to investigate new superconducting amplifier designs. He did summer research on problems in quantum optomechanics in the Harris Lab at Yale. He is currently involved in understanding the origin and behavior of parasitic capacitance in Josephson junction arrays, as well as investigating a second generation fluxonium quantum bit in the Qulab. In his leisure time he enjoys sports, piano concerts, philosophy and writing.

Anirudh Narla

Anirudh was born in the city of Hyderabad, a city in southern India. He graduated from UC Berkeley in 2010 with a B.S in Engineering Physics. While there, he worked with Irfan Siddiqi to build a dilution refrigerator and its control electronics and software for new nanoscale magnetometry experiments. He joined QuLab in the summer of 2011 and currently works on parametric amplifiers.

Kyle Serniak

Kyle was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania before completing high school and college in Florida. In 2013, he graduated from Florida State University with a B.S. in Physics and Applied Mathematics where he worked with Irinel Chiorescu studying planar resonators for use in ESR spectrometers, and with Al Stiegman modeling interesting problems in microwave chemistry. Kyle joined Qulab in the summer of 2013 to work on superconducting WGMRs and the fluxonium project.

Clarke Smith

Clarke grew up in Harvard, Massachusetts. He studied math and physics at George Washington University, writing his thesis on asymmetric nuclear scattering of gamma rays. Coming to Yale in 2012, Clarke currently works on simulation of fluxonium circuits.

Steven Touzard

Steven was born in Grenoble, France. He attended a "classe prepa" in Physics and Chemistry at the Lycee du Parc. In 2011 he entered the Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan (ENS) where he received a B.S in collaboration with Universite Pierre and Marie Curie. After his first year of Master's degree, Steven joined the lab for a gap year and then became a graduate student in 2014.

Uri Vool

Uri was born in Donetsk, Ukraine and grew up in Jerusalem, Israel. In 2010, he graduated from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem with a B.Sc. in math and physics. While there, he worked with Nadav Katz on simulating and benchmarking multi-level qudit gates. At Yale, Uri studied Bath Engineering schemes with Steve Girvin and recently joined the work on the Fluxonium project.

Zhixin Wang

Zhixin was born and raised in China. He received his Bachelor degree in Microelectronics from Tsinghua University at Beijing in 2015. While at Tsinghua, he studied quantum optics and quantum information theory, and later worked on growth and characterization of topological insulators. In Fall 2013, he was an UCEAP exchange student at University of California, Santa Barbra, pursued non-degree study in Physics, and investigated quantum transport in superconductor-semiconductor mesoscopic heterostructures. In the summer of 2014, he was a visiting student in research at the Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, working on theoretical optics, and attempting the broadband generalization of coherent perfect absorbers (CPA). Since joining Qlab in the fall of 2015, he has been investigating superconductor-semiconductor nanowire hybrid quantum circuits and cold microwave cavity attenuators.

Evan Zalys-Geller

Evan graduated from the College of CreativeStudies at UCSB, where he obtained degrees in Physics and Computer Science and investigated dielectric quality factors at low temperature with the Martinis group. Evan joined Qulab in the summer of 2013 to work on remotely entangling distant qubits using measurement.